QR codes – Thing 9 – some thoughts about the uses for radio archives

This week has been about Thing 9, QR codes of ANZ 23 Mobile Things.

I do not think we have seen the end of the uses of QR codes, and that it can be applied in so many different ways in the library and archive environments.

I was thinking about our own radio archive environment:

– How fantastic would it be to have a museum archive of some of our Radio Archives material, with QR codes pointing to some audio and sounds from the archives!

– To put up QR codes in our offices, pointing to blog posts about our collections and our archivists.

– To have QR codes pointing to our website and contact details in the reception area.

– To add QR codes to our archived formats, pointing to the meta data on our cataloguing systems.

– To make screencasts and video tutorials of how to for the radio archives.

We made a QR code for the SABC Media Libraries’ blog, but only as a type of experiment and to see how it works.

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I also made a Vine to test Screencasting earlier in ANZ 23 Mobile Things: Screencasting to use QR codes.

I do not think we have seen the end of QR codes and their uses yet!

In the meantime, I am overwhelmed by the New Librarianship Master Class open online course which started this week.

I love the material, and how it has opened up my eyes to the fact that we (as librarians/archivists/Information Professionals) are the masters of our own destinies!

Calendars on the go

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I have enjoyed the past week of learning more about Calendar, Thing 8 of 23 Mobile Things.

This year is the first year I am going without a paper-based diary in my handbag. I have transferred all my reminders and calendar updates to my Blackberry smartphone, as well as my iPad.
On the one hand it is very liberating to have everything on the go, but on the other hand there is a definitive loss of information.
The information that is stored with a certain event, is also lost when the event is cancelled, for example…

I use the Blackberry Calendar, as well as the iPad Calendar, and it is both linked to my Google Calendar. The syncing between the calendars does not always seem to “work”, but I am willing to admit that I need some more experience.

We use Outlook Explorer Calendars at work, and I prefer to keep that separate from my personal calendars. We use it mostly at work to coordinate events and send invites, which work very well!
I am thinking of setting up a calendar on our Media Library’s website, with only the most important yearly events. (On my to-do list)

I downloaded iCalendar and am still experimenting with it! I love the colours that can be inserted, and how it displays, but so far I haven’t found anything special or must-have that is different from what I have already.

One of the great things with Calendars is the reminder and alert options! I do not schedule any event anymore without an alarm going off.

Nowadays I am even sending invites to family and friends via the Calendars, because it inserts the events on their Calendars as well, and reminds them!

I inserted this Calendar of free webinars for librarians into the iCalendar, and can see that I will be doing more of these to remind myself of wonderful opportunities for personal development. (Why is it not reflected on my other calendars as well? It was one through Google Calendar.)

New Librarianship Master Class open online course – 1st MOOC

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Screen capture of The Atlas of New Librarianship

I had signed up to the Hyperlinked Libraries MOOC a while back. I was only notified yesterday that there were over 1100 participants, and they have only space for 400. So I did not make it onto the course this time.

I think there should have been a cut-off as soon as their limits were reached?

I also saw this MOOC being advocated through the International Librarians Network, and have signed up to David R Lankes New Librarianship Master Class through the iSchool at Syracuse University. Apparently there is still time to sign up.

I struggled today to download my ebook version of The Atlas of New Librarianship, but finally managed to get it on my iPad!

This is the email that I sent to the iMOOC facilitators today, just to give them a shout-out about some of the issues we are struggling with:

Dear iMOOC facilitators,

Just a quick note that I struggled a great deal today to purchase The Atlas of New Librarianship from MIT Press. I tried to make use of the discount code that you have supplied, but only after countless attempts and contacting Tech Support did they tell me it was only for the print version.

That should have been stated from the start!

Luckily the Tech Support gave me a 20% discount on the ebook as well.
I nearly gave up out of shear frustration.

I am planning to do this course on my iPad, because I still don’t have a computer at home!

 

Truly mobile for ANZ 23 Mobile Things!

It is easier to blog than to comment

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#CommentJuly is struggling to get out of the starting blocks over here…

I believe in commenting, and know how much it means when you get a comment on a blog post.

But it is extremely difficult to write a comment, and sign in with one of the accounts, and press publish! (It should not be!)
It just do not get published!

I am also still struggling being a digital have-not (after the computer theft), because it is more difficult for me to comment on my iPad than it is to write a blog post.

I am having to do it from my iPad, and trying to do it from my WordPress app.
I have even tried going through the web browser on my iPad. Also without any success.

I must mention here that Blogger gives a much better interface than trying to comment on WordPress. But it is still a huge schlep!

I hope all the blogging platforms start making it easier to comment!